Year 1 - Curriculum Topic Plan (Where the Wild Things Are) Summer Term 2017

English (from N.C. Statutory Requirements)

  • use question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences
  • use capital letters for names of people, places, the days of the week and for the personal pronoun I
  • use the terms: word, singular, plural
  • use the common exception words from lists 1, 2 and 3
  • read aloud my work clearly enough to be heard by my teacher and classmates
  • use –ing, -ed, -er, -est where no change is needed in the spelling of the root word
  • use the prefix un-
  • use the spelling rule for adding ¬-s or ¬–es as the plural marker for nouns or the third person plural marker for verbs
  • use letter names to distinguish between alternative spellings of the same sound
  • spell the days of the week
  • spell the common exception words from list 3:
  • were, there, where, love, one, once, ask, friend, school, put, push, pull, full, house, our.

Maths (from N.C. Statutory Requirements)

  • recognise the coins: 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p, £1 and £2
  • read and say amounts of money using the coins 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p
  • recognise the coins: £1 and £2
  • read and say amounts of money using the coins £1 and £2
  • count, say and record amounts of money using the coins 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p, £1 and £2
  • recognise the notes: £5 and £10
  • read and say amounts of money using the notes £5 and £10
  • solve simple problems involving money
  • double numbers up to at least 10
  • halve numbers up to (at least) 20
  • count (from zero) in equal steps of 2s
  • count (from zero) in equal steps of 5s
  • count (from zero) in equal steps of 10s
  • use concrete objects to solve one-step problems involving multiplication
  • use concrete objects to solve one-step problems involving division (grouping and sharing)
  • use pictorial representations to solve one-step problems involving multiplication
  • use pictorial representations to solve one-step problems involving division (grouping and sharing)
  • use arrays to solve one-step problems involving multiplication
  • use arrays to solve one-step problems involving division.

Solve problems involving:

  • reading and writing numbers from 1 to 20 in numerals and words
  • identifying and representing numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line, and use the language of: equal to, more than, less than (fewer), most, least
  • counting, reading and writing numbers to 100 in numerals; count in multiples of twos, fives and tens
  • given a number, identify one more and one less
  • counting to and across 100, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number
  • representing and using number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20
  • reading , writing and interpreting mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (–) and equals (=) signs
  • adding and subtracting one-digit and two-digit numbers to 20, including zero
  • one-step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number problems such as 7 = ? – 9

Science (from N.C. Statutory Requirements)

  • identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees
  • identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees
  • identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense.

Art and Design (from N.C. Subject Content)

  • about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work
  • to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination
  • to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Computing (from N.C. Subject Content)

  • use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content
  • recognise common uses of information technology beyond school
  • use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

Design and Technology (from N.C. Subject Content)

  • explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products
  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology
  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing]
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.

Geography (from N.C. Subject Content)

  • name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas
  • use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to
  • use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom.

History (from N.C. Subject Content)

  • significant historical events, people and places in their own locality. (Mary Anning)

Languages (from N.C. Subject Content)

  • N/A

Music (from N.C. Subject Content)

  • use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes
  • play tuned and untuned instruments musically
  • listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music
  • experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.

Physical Education (from N.C. Subject Content)

  • master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities
  • participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending
  • perform dances using simple movement patterns.